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Power meten? Hoe breng je je prestatievermogen in kaart?

Measuring power? How do you map your performance?

, by Lorenzo d'Hont | BodyZoom, 6 min reading time


Training based on power has many advantages over training based on heart rate. But how and what do you measure?

Training based on power has many advantages over training based on heart rate. Measuring is very direct, while your heart rate always lags a bit, especially during tough interval training. In addition, training with a power meter excludes external factors such as temperature, stress and fatigue.

But how do you measure?
To map your performance while cycling or running, you can use functional threshold power (FTP) and maximum oxygen uptake (Vo 2 max). In practice, FTP is often used to determine the intensity of individual training zones. Because FTP is a good predictor of endurance performance such as a half or full triathlon.

In the previous article Dennis explained how to perform an FTP test. Try to perform the FTP test 5 to 7 times per season, this will give you more insight into your current level and training effect. But which training zones can you use?

Misuse
For cycling, Hunter and Coggan training zones have been chosen in this article because they are based on the principles of exercise physiology.

Zone 1: Active recovery (<55% of FTP)
The training sessions in this zone are aimed at active recovery and last between 30 and 90 minutes.

Zone 2: Endurance training (56 -75% of FTP)
In this zone, gentle endurance training is performed, ranging from 60 to 300 minutes.

Zone 3: Tempo endurance training (76 - 90% of FTP)
The training methods in this zone consist of longer tempos (30 minutes) and more intensive endurance blocks (3 x 10 minutes). The duration of training in this zone varies between 60 and 120 minutes.

Zone 4: FTP training (91 – 105% of FTP)
Longer interval training sessions are completed in this zone. The duration and number of interval blocks depend on your training and experience with intervals. The duration of an interval varies from 3 to 30 minutes.

Zone 5: VO2 max training (106 – 120% of FTP)
In this zone, shorter interval blocks are often completed with interval blocks of 3 – 8 minutes.

Zone 6: Anaerobic capacity training (121 – 150%
This form of training consists of short, very intensive intervals (HIT or HIIT training) that last 30 seconds to 3 minutes.

Zone 7: Neuromuscular power (>150%) .
These are the sprints that are fully executed and where you analyze your capabilities. The duration is therefore shorter than 30 seconds.

Example cycling
Let's take Dennis' 20 minute FTP test as an example for determining his training zones. During this test he achieved an average value of 318 watts. His FTP is: 0.95 * 318 = 302 watts. His training zones will then look like this:

Training zone

%FTP

Wattage (lower and upper limits)

1: Active recovery

< 55%

<166

2: Duration

56 – 75%

169 – 227

3: Tempo duration

76 – 90%

230 – 272

4: FTP training

91 – 105%

275 – 317

5: VO2max

106 – 120%

320 – 362

6: Anaerobic capacity

121 – 150%

365 – 453

7: Neuromuscular

> 150%

>453

 

To run
For running, training zones written by van Megen and van Dijk have been chosen in this article because they are also based on the principles of exercise physiology.

Zone 1: Active recovery (< 70% of ADV)

This zone focuses on active recovery and lasts between 30 and 90 minutes. You also warm up and cool down in this zone.

Zone 2: Endurance training (70 – 80% of the ADV)

Trainings in this zone consist of gentle endurance training of 10 to 15 km during the week. On the weekend these are the long endurance training sessions of 15+ km.

Zone 3: Tempo endurance training (80 – 90% of the ADV)

The training methods in this zone consist of longer tempos and more intensive endurance blocks. For example, think of 2 to 5 km. The rest periods between blocks are relatively short.

Zone 4: ADV training (90 – 100% of the ADV)

Longer interval training sessions are completed in this zone. The interval blocks have a length of 800, 1000 or 1200 m.

Zone 5: VO 2 max training (100 – 110% of the ADV)

The training forms in this zone are often shorter interval blocks of 400 or 600 m.

Zone 6: Anaerobic capacity training (110 – 150% of the ADV)

These are short, very intensive intervals of 200 and 300m

Zone 7: Neuromuscular power (150% of ADV)

In this zone the very short and fierce sprints of 50 to 100 m are completed. Look after! These workouts can be very taxing on your tendons and muscles.

Example running
Before running, Dennis performed a 10-minute ADV test. During this test he achieved an average value of 250 watts. His ADV is: 250 / 1.13 = 222 watts. His training zones will then look like this:

Training zone

%FTP

Wattage (lower and upper limits)

1: Active recovery

< 70%

<155

2: Duration

70 – 80%

155 – 178

3: Tempo duration

80 – 90%

178 – 200

4: ADV training

90 – 100%

200 – 222

5: VO2max

100 – 110%

22 – 244

6: Anaerobic capacity

110 – 150%

244 – 333

7: Neuromuscular

> 150%

> 333

Tip: look at the big picture
Lorenzo d'Hont from Bodyzoom really focuses on the total picture. Training, sleep, breathing, mindset and nutrition. The right balance ensures better performance.

Are you unfamiliar with training based on power? Or do you have little experience with drawing up a schedule yourself? Consult a coach or trainer who is familiar with power-based training. He/she can help you determine the number of intensive intervals, the duration of intensive endurance blocks or tempo training. This may prevent injuries or other physical discomfort.

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Measuring power? How do you map your performance?